Breakfast

Breakfast

Worldwide, Oatmeal is considered to be the healthiest breakfast. It also tastes great each and everyday. It helps prevent diabetes & lower cholesterol, is rich in dietary fibers, is filling for a long period of time and even helps keep your skin shiny and healthy. Pure “silan”, or date honey, sweetens our oatmeal in a natural way. It’s rich in healthy components including calcium, iron and vitamins. “Dry shredded coconut” gives our breakfast a great taste and increases the fat content which we will be burning off during the hike. “Cinnamon” adds flavor and contributes to our healthy diet. “Raw Tahini” will give a milky texture to our oatmeal as it adds the flavor of halva. It is also a primary source of calcium in our menu and is therefore highly recommended to prevent stress fractures on the trail.

Lunch

Lunch

Lunch is “third world” style as it needs to be prepared in the morning and stay out all day without being refrigerated. Not to mention the fact that there is no restaurant to buy food. It is simple, cooked food that is nourishing and can be kept in an airtight container without refrigeration for a number of hours. Every morning to group members will wake up a bit earlier than the rest and begin preparing the cooked lunch. A pot of rice, lentils and cut up vegetables such as onion, carrot, eggplant and pepper. A legume like orange lentils can also be added. Other examples include pasta in a tomato and vegetable sauce and pita on a saj oven. During the journey you’ll learn to master making bedouin pita dough and cooking on a saj over the campfire. The pitas go great with tehini and silan. In the mornings, we’ll serve fresh fruits and vegetables like cucumbers, tomatoes and dates. In the spring we’ll bring oranges which are extremely refreshing on the hike and are great for packing in a bag thanks to their thick peel. In the fall, we’ll serve apples.

Dinner

Dinner

During dinner, legumes which are packed with protein are a primary replacement for meat. We soak them in water a day ahead of time replacing the water several times. At night, we have more time for slow cooking and will use vegetables like potatoes, sweet potatoes, beets, and legumes like red and white beans, chick peas, green, brown and black lentils, and whole and cracked peas.

Tea and Coffee

Tea and Coffee

Our large hot water kettle is almost always ready to hang over the fire. In the morning when we wake up, in the afternoon when we lodge and throughout the evening and night around the campfire. There’s a kit next to the fire with various types of tea, coffee and sugar (though the cup is on you)

                                                                     What Do We Eat On The Journey?

We put an emphasis on eating food that is healthy and nourishing. Food that is simply cooked and tasty based on fruits, vegetables, legumes and different grains.

We don't have the capacity to refrigerate food and therefore avoid all dairy and meat products.  When the weather is not so hot, we eat eggs but keep them separate as we don't want to make any group members uncomfortable.

Our menu has been perfected over years and is designed, thanks to constant consulting with a dietitian, nutritionist, and kosher certifier, to provide the optimal nutrition needed for our journey that is physically demanding day-in and day-out.

We have a fully equipped kitchen on the back of our truck, as well as a field kitchen, that is stocked with all necessary products. During the first days of the journey you'll learn your way around our kitchen and quickly be able to independently prepare food in large enough quantities for the whole group. Our meals are divided into three: breakfast which will be eaten early in the morning; lunch which will be prepared in the morning and taken on the trek in airtight plastic containers which will allow each group member to walk and eat at his or her own pace and not be dependent on the larger group; and dinner which is eaten together at the campsite around the fire.